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​News | NTU, TTSH team up to improve doctor-patient communication

Published on: 22-Nov-2018

Professor KK Luke (Chair, SoH) and Assistant Professor Lim Ni Eng (Chinese, SoH) worked together with Tan Tock Seng Hospital to improve communication in healthcare. 

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Media release by NTU: click here

Below are the news stories on this collaboration:

NTU, TTSH team up to improve doctor-patient communication
The Straits Times
 
A new joint study by researchers from NTU and clinicians from Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH) aims to offer a novel approach to improve the human dimension of healthcare – in the form of conversation analysis (CA). The study was led by Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng from the NTU School of Humanities in collaboration with Adj Asst Prof Png Keng Siang, a senior consultant at TTSH’s urology department. From mid-2016 to mid-2018, 150 first-visit consultations at TTSH urology clinics were filmed with the written consent of the patients. The footage was processed to remove personally identifiable information. These recordings were then transcribed, scrutinised and analysed, said Prof Luke yesterday during a media briefing at TTSH. By identifying the context of a given interaction and any instances of misunderstanding, the researchers also noted specific points at which doctors could improve their communication with patients or their families and caregivers. Asst Prof Lim said, “We found that when the doctors pick up on these concerns or fears, they usually try to give the patients even more information, for example, by talking about anaesthetics or risks, or by describing the procedure in detail, but this does not reassure them. The patients are looking for empathy, not just information.” Instead, the doctor could describe how previous patients responded positively to the procedure, he added. Click here to read article
 
NTU and TTSH researchers study how to improve doctor-patient communication
Straits Times online, 21 Nov 
  
A new joint study by researchers from NTU and clinicians from TTSH aims to offer a novel approach to improve the human dimension of healthcare – in the form of conversation analysis (CA). The study was led by Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng from the NTU School of Humanities in collaboration with Adj Asst Prof Png Keng Siang, a senior consultant at TTSH’s urology department. 150 first-visit consultations at TTSH urology clinics were filmed and analysed. "Studying the language, responses and social psychology in the clinical setting gives us insights on what makes patients more receptive to doctors' recommendations and more willing to go through necessary tests," Prof Luke said. The team plans to expand the use of CA beyond the urology department to other areas in TTSH, including ophthalmology and palliative care. Asst Prof Lim said, "End-of-life conversations are a medical issue and yet deeply human. We want to see how we can get caretakers and patients to talk about important things at the last stage of life. It's important not just for the terminal patients but also their caretakers, who need closure." Click here to read article
 
Better bedside manners for doctors on the cards with NTU-TTSH study
TODAY online, 21 Nov
 
It is not uncommon for patients to walk out of a doctor’s consultation room feeling confused or unsatisfied with the session. To improve the experience for patients and to provide better medical services, researchers from NTU and clinicians at TTSH are taking up a joint study on the communication flow between doctors and patients. The study, which compiled and analysed video recordings of 150 first-visit consultations at TTSH’s urology clinics, aims to give doctors more insight into what makes patients more receptive to medical procedures, and how to help them feel more satisfied with their consultations. It will also train doctors to better communicate the importance of medical tests, and address their patients’ fears. Dr Png Keng Siang, an adjunct assistant professor and senior consultant at TTSH’s urology department, collaborated with two NTU researchers – Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng – for the study. Prof Luke, who is the chair of NTU's School of Humanities and associate dean (research) of the College of Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, said, “Studying the languages, responses and social psychology in the clinical setting gives us insights on what makes patients more receptive to doctors’ recommendations. What we are hoping to offer is another layer in learning, (for students) to observe real consultations on video, which they can rewind and play again to analyse together with facilitators, (and learn) how to better improve the conversation.” Click here to read article
 
NTU researchers analyse consultations to help doctors and patients communicate more effectively
Lianhe Zaobao, page 15 and online
 
Researchers from NTU and clinicians from TTSH collaborated to film and analyse 150 first visit consultations at the hospital’s urology clinics. They analysed doctor-patient communication, including the patients’ tone, response, facial expression and the questions they raised. This is to find effective ways that enhance doctor-patient communication and reduce misunderstandings and dissatisfaction. Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng from NTU’s School of Humanities said if patients give little or no response after the doctor’s explanation, or keep asking if the procedures are necessary, these could be signs of apprehension and fear. Patients may not vocalise their fear so doctors have to see patients’ responses to sense their emotion. The group has shared their findings with the Urology department at TTSH and aim to work with the Ophthalmology department next. Click here to read article
 
Study on doctor-patient communication found that silence or little response from patient may be signs of apprehension and fear; doctors should assure patients timely
Lianhe Wanbao, 21 Nov
 
When patients give little or no response, it could be a sign of their fear. Instead of giving more information about the therapy, doctors should sense patients’ fear timely and assure them. To enhance doctor-patient interaction, researchers from NTU and clinicians from TTSH collaborated to film and analyse 150 consultations at the hospital’s urology clinics. Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng from NTU’s School of Humanities pointed out in an interview that patients may not vocalise their fear so doctors have to see patients’ responses to sense their emotion.
 
“Conversation Analysis” helps doctors understand patients’ fear better
Shin Min Daily News, 21 Nov
 
“Conversation Analysis” which is used to study social interactions, can help doctors to understand patients’ worries better and reduce their fear during medical consultations. A new joint study by researchers from NTU and clinicians from TTSH used Conversation Analysis to effectively enhance doctor-patient interaction. Conversation Analysis is a fresh approach relevant for the local medical sector. 
 
TTSH and NTU gathered and analysed doctor-patient conversations to enhance communication
Channel 8 News online (off 95.8FM), 21 Nov
 
NTU and TTSH collaborated to analyse 150 doctor-patient interactions to enhance communication. A common reason for patients to be referred to Urology clinics is the presence of blood in urine. As this can be caused by various reasons, a first-visit consultation often involves the recommendation of various diagnostic procedures, in order to pinpoint the exact cause behind the symptom. The research team’s analysis found that many patients fear cystoscopy and are apprehensive about undergoing multiple tests. To enhance the communication process, doctors can be more aware of patients’ subconscious signs of fear. Click here to read article
 
NTU and Tan Tock Seng Hospital’s joint study aims to improve doctor-patient communication
Connected to India
 
Researchers from NTU Singapore and clinicians at TTSH have worked together in a joint study to look at doctor-patient communication can be improved. The research team is one of the first groups in Singapore to use Conversation Analysis – a method for studying social interactions – in a hospital setting. In Conversation Analysis, researchers analyse the verbal and non-verbal aspects during each person’s turn to talk. Researchers will be able to give clinicians specific recommendations in terms of what to say, and how to say it at a specific point. The study involved an analysis of 150 doctor-patient conversations at TTSH’s Urology clinics. It was led by Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng, both from NTU’s School of Humanities, in collaboration with Adjunct Asst Prof Png Keng Siang, Senior Consultant, Department of Urology, TTSH. Click here to read article
 
NTU and TTSH join forces to improve doctor-patient communication
Medicalnewser, 21 Nov
 
A joint study by researchers from NTU Singapore and clinicians at TTSH has yielded insights into how doctors can better communicate the value of clinical investigations to patients. For example, when addressing a patient’s concern about pain during a procedure, just explaining the use of anaesthetics may not be enough to reduce the fear. Instead, the doctor can share what his past patients said about their experience. The research team is one of the first groups in Singapore to use Conversation Analysis, a method for studying social interaction, in a hospital setting. The study which involved an analysis of 150 doctor-patient conversations at TTSH’s Urology clinics was led by Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng, both from NTU School of Humanities, in collaboration with Adjunct Assistant Professor Png Keng Siang, Senior Consultant, Department of Urology, TTSH. Click here to read article
- Similar article in News Medical Net.

NTU and Tan Tock Seng Hospital's joint study aims to improve doctor-patient communication
MSN 

Researchers from NTU Singapore and clinicians at TTSH have worked together in a joint study to look at doctor-patient communication can be improved. The research team is one of the first groups in Singapore to use Conversation Analysis – a method for studying social interactions – in a hospital setting. In Conversation Analysis, researchers analyse the verbal and non-verbal aspects during each person's turn to talk. Researchers will be able to give clinicians specific recommendations in terms of what to say, and how to say it at a specific point. The study involved an analysis of 150 doctor-patient conversations at TTSH's Urology clinics. It was led by Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng, both from NTU's School of Humanities, in collaboration with Adjunct Asst Prof Png Keng Siang, Senior Consultant, Department of Urology, TTSH.
Click here to read article

 

How can doctors better communicate with patients?
International Travel & Health Insurance Journal (UK)

A recent study has shed light on how doctors can better communicate the value of clinical investigations to patients. The research, jointly conducted by NTU Singapore and clinicians at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), also in Singapore, studied social interaction in a hospital setting using a method called conversion analysis, in which videos of interactions in an authentic setting are transcribed verbatim and analysed. The study involved an analysis of 150 doctor-patient conversations at TTSH's Urology clinics led by Prof Luke Kang Kwong Kapathy and Asst Prof Lim Ni Eng, both from NTU School of Humanities, in collaboration with Adjunct Assistant Professor Png Keng Siang, Senior Consultant, Department of Urology, TTSH. Prof Luke said: "Current medical education already includes communication training, but we want to go a step further in looking at the actual interactions in the clinics. Studying the languages, responses and social psychology in the clinical setting gives us insights on what makes patients more receptive to doctors' recommendations, which may lead to patients being more willing to go through necessary tests and increased patient satisfaction." Click here to read article


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